Trip Report


 

Tree Swallows, Beaver Lake, by John Hanna

 

Spring Warbler Workshop

May 6, 2015

 

 

    The leaves were already well out as we walked around the new boardwalks at the Elisha Mitchell Audubon’s Beaver Lake Bird Sanctuary. While the trees were filled with the songs of spring birds, the migrant warblers were notably Pileated Woodpecker (M)absent. A pair of Brown-headed Nuthatches was feeding chicks in the dead snag and a male Orchard Oriole was a nice sight as it sang from a high willow tree. Other birds included Tree Swallow, Green Heron multiple Gray Catbirds, a very-obliging Pileated Woodpecker and actually yes, we did have a few warblers – a very skittish Northern Waterthrush, 2 singing Common Yellowthroats and a Yellow-throated Warbler (all staying hidden!)
    Ovenbird by Simon Thompson   

 

    The day was already warming up as we drove up into the Blue Ridge and looked forward to enjoying our summer-resident warblers. A stop at my house produced a singing Cape May Warbler that stayed high in the tall Norway Spruces, Ovenbirds, Black-and-white, Hooded, Black-throated Green and Hooded Warblers were all singing from the rapidly-greening Parkway woodlands, but despite the lack of leaves, some of these birds played hard to get.

Black and White Warbler

 

     The day was already warming up as we drove up into the Blue Ridge and looked forward to enjoying our summer-resident warblers. A stop at my house produced a singing Cape May Warbler that stayed high in the tall Norway Spruces, Ovenbirds, Black-and-white, Hooded, Black-throated Green and Hooded Warblers were all singing from the rapidly-greening Parkway woodlands, but despite the lack of leaves, some of these birds played hard to get. Thankfully both Blackburnian and Cerulean Warblers gave us some excellent views and we Delicious Local Picnics by John Hannawatched the very bright female Cerulean taking web from a tent caterpillar nest to line her new nest.  As well as getting a nice selection of forest-living warblers, we had great views of Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Scarlet Tanager, Veery and both Broad-winged and Red-tailed Hawks.

We finished up with 65 total species and 14 warblers for what turned into a beautiful warm spring day.

 

Simon Thompson

 

Black-throated Blue Warbler